Getting to The Core Of Catalog Marketing Advice

I received an email recently from the CEO of a company that, like Datamann, is a supplier to the catalog industry.  He was commenting on one of my recent blog postings, and offered an observation about a problem that he saw within the industry.

He mentioned that many online media outlets are reporting on companies that use Artificial Intelligence (A.I.) in their quest to find new customers and correctly target existing ones. He stated that in most of these articles the term A.I. is misused. The companies profiled are instead using “just predictive models (typically neural networks) and not true generalized ‘artificial intelligence’ at all. But claiming the use of AI is all the rage among Marketing Tech vendors (and the online media reporting on their activities) and causing massive confusion among the marketers I speak with.”

I knew exactly what he was meant. At a company I was previously associated with, every new service or product that was introduced – no matter how mundane – was promoted as having “advanced analytics”.   So we’ve progressed from advanced analytics to artificial intelligence, and both turn out to be an exaggeration.

This vendor went on to describe many of the innovative services and products that his company provides their clients.   Some of them sounded pretty cool – even cutting edge. But he wasn’t trying to impress me or sell me anything. Instead he wanted to make a point that so many of us have to contend with. Some of his products are really meant to make a mailer’s job more efficient and easier. But what is the client’s typical response? “Cool – but now what should I do? Can’t the system just act on these insights for me?”

He bemoaned the death of fundamental marketing skills among most catalog mailers, stating that “the Staples ‘Easy Button’ for marketing has become fully realized and it’s doing far more harm than good at many companies today.”

We all see it. When I polled mailers and marketers for what they wanted to learn at our seminar next week (yes, it is now less than two weeks away), the marketers I contacted almost universally asked for “the five most important metrics I need to run my business.”  When I explain to mailers that those metrics are different for everyone, they lose patience. They don’t want to hear that – they want me to skip to the “best” metrics and reports that everyone else uses.

I can’t blame mailers for not having the patience to understand that their business – as is everyone else’s – is unique. I’ve mentioned before (perhaps ad nauseam) that there has been a talent drain in the catalog industry. Maybe a more accurate statement is to say there just aren’t many staff left at many catalogs. It’s not that the individuals left lack talent – it is simply a fact that in just about every catalog company, the jobs of five people eight years ago are now being done by one or two people. The reasons that this has happened are endless.

It Is Always A Step Backwards

When staff is downsized, it is almost always a step backwards. What happens when someone is downsized or leaves and you are left to do your job and the other guy’s job? You cheat, and take short cuts to get your job done. Maybe cheating is not the right word, because it implies that what you did was ethically improper. That’s not the case. But you need to find a way to get more done, so you look for the easiest route. One of those routes is to outsource your marketing and circulation planning.

There are plenty of consultants in the industry that will do circulation planning and/or modeling for clients. The vast majority of these folks are ex-mailers. They know their stuff, and generally they are all good at what they do.  I perform the circulation planning for a handful of Datamann clients. My methods are no better or worse than those of other consultants. We each have our little quirks that make how we do it different from the other guy – but no one has a secret sauce, beyond experience.

But here is what bothers me. I view circulation planning as being a core function of the catalog. That’s because that was the role I filled as a cataloger. Of course I want to think of my job being “core” to the success of the company. I have always felt it was a mistake for catalog companies to “farm out” their circulation planning. To me it is a relatively easy exercise. But when you have someone else do it, you become that much further removed from the business. Once you start letting someone else plan the circulation, after a few seasons you start to skip looking at the reports that consultants like me provide that show how the last mailing performed, and how the next one is planned. You start to lose touch with how your customer is performing.

This phenomenon of losing contact with your customer is even more pronounced when you have someone doing your circulation planning via modeling. At least with RFM, if you wanted to, you could see how each customer segment is performing. But modeling requires a huge leap of faith. You are often mailing huge swaths of your customer file in very large segments, simply defined as Segment 1, Segment 2, etc. Yes, you can see a difference in response between the segments, but can you tell which portions of your customers are not responding?  Do you even take the time to ask the modelers, or do you simply assume that they are doing the best job that can be done?

It’s one thing to hire a consultant like Kevin Hillstrom or Frank Oliver to come in and provide you with an assessment of what you are doing. Maybe even have them build you a model. But, consultants like Kevin, Frank and me are always willing to teach you, the mailer, how to do what we just did for you, so you can replicate it and carry on the process when we are finished with our assignment. Rarely do mailers want to do that. They want that “Easy Button”.

I’m not knocking companies that do hire outside modelers. There are many of you that are big enough to justify modeling, but not big enough to hire your own in-house statistician to do it.  The problem is that it is not that much of stretch to go from the “easy button” of modeling to being confused by discussions of artificial intelligence to think that your model should be able to “learn by itself” what to do next.

I don’t see this as an issue with every mailer. People that have been “around for a while” know what is, and what is not, possible. It’s the younger professional, mostly from the ecommerce side of the business that suddenly find themselves also responsible for the catalog that think there should be an algorithm for everything. “Facebook can determine what kinds of people are most desirable to view my ad, why can’t your model just figure out the 2% of the people that are going to respond, and mail to them”.   They of course understand that Facebook’s response is not going to be 100%, but can’t understand why the postal model should not be attaining 100% response.

In my opinion, there is no “easy button” to catalog marketing. You have to be involved. You can hire others for their expertise, but don’t become too reliant on them. If you put too much of your business on “autopilot”, you will lose touch you’re your customer, and what they are doing. Your company will become an example of the old joke about the guy that jumped from a 10 story building, and people kept hearing him say as he passed each floor “Okay so far”.

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by Bill LaPierre

VP – Business Intelligence and Analytics

Datamann – 800-451-4263 x235

blapierre@datamann.com

 

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You Can Ignore Most of It

This week marks the fifth year anniversary of my starting this blog at Datamann.  I’m going to use the occasion to share a brief personal observation that relates directly to catalogs.

I received several emails last week from readers who agreed with my comments that their catalog could get along just fine with “less perfect” photographs and design. These comments were from the marketing and circulation people who are trying to stretch their budgets, and actually have some money left over to mail the catalog after the creative department has spent a big chunk of the budget on up-front fixed costs like photography and design.

Here was one comment: “Could not agree more that we could get by with ‘good enough’ photography. However, when this is suggested to our creative team, they lose their minds. Any suggestions on how to overcome that?”

Well, let’s try this.  Let’s say you were acquired by new owners, and they mandated that the budget for new photography be cut by 70%? What would you do? Some people would simply throw up their arms and say “You’ll kill the catalog. You don’t understand! We can’t just photograph this new light fixture in any old setting; it has to be done in just the right location, with at least three models, and a dog.” Others, who realize that they have to live within the confines of this new reality, would take some action.

The question becomes, what is important, and what is just noise?

Most of the readers of this blog are unaware of the fact that I am almost deaf.  Most of you have never met me, and if you have, unless you notice my hearing aid, you are probably unaware of the fact that I can’t hear a word you are saying if we are in a crowd.

Ten years ago, I contracted an illness which left me completely deaf in one ear, and with only 40% hearing in the other, which gets increased to 70% with my hearing aid. So, I have about 20% of the normal hearing range that most people have.

What does this have to do with catalogs? Everything.   You see, I have learned to get through the day by ignoring much of what is going on around me, because I can’t hear it anyway. Your customer does the same with your catalog.

In one-on-one situations, I’m OK. Even with three or four people in a room, I can carry on a conversation without too much difficulty. The worst situation is a large crowd – like the coffee break at a crowded conference. You can be standing right next me and practically yell into my good ear, and I can’t tell what you are saying.

I know I’m probably going to get in trouble for saying this, but I’ve learned that 90% of what most people are saying in situations like that can be ignored, and no one can tell that I’m not listening to them. I can tell when someone is asking me a question, because the tone of their voice changes. I can hear a change in frequency and tone, although I don’t know what is being said. So when I detect that someone is asking a question, I lean in and ask them to repeat it. Otherwise, I just stand there and smile and nod. Most people just think I’ve become more agreeable in the past ten years.

Your customer does the same thing with your catalog. They are browsing it. They are flipping through looking at products. They want to see that you have the product knowledge and authority to sell this product. But they are ignoring most of it.

I used this spread (below) from the Cabela’s catalog last fall in a posting on hunting catalogs. They used one lifestyle photo on the spread to show they had “authority” when it came to selling cold weather gear, but the rest of the product photos are all lay-flat studio shots. I know some catalogs where every item would have to be a lifestyle shot. Is that necessary?

The problem is that many catalog creative directors, and merchants, insist on a specific and consistent “look, feel, and theme” to the catalog, to convey a lifestyle, or as Kevin Hillstrom calls it, your “Unique Point of View”.  And there is something to be said for having a “unified” creative look to a catalog.  But everything does not have to be perfect. In my opinion, sometimes when everything looks “too perfect”, your catalog has the same appeal as a mailer from Verizon trying to get me to switch phone plans.

Stop thinking that your customer is curling up in front of the fireplace with a glass of wine to read your catalog – and only your catalog – cover to cover. If that ever did happen, it hasn’t happened in the last 10 years. Your customer has a thousand things going on in their life. Media is on all the time. Some will argue that this exactly the reason that you should, YOU MUST spend a ton of money and time on truly exquisite creative, that will standout and catch the reader’s attention.

But here is where my deafness comes in. “I have learned to get through the day by ignoring much of what is going on around me, because I can’t hear it anyway. Your customer does the same with your catalog.” Your customer is motivated by your merchandise. Your merchandise is your brand. The depth, variety and diversity of your product assortment are what will drive a response. Truly creative people can develop effective and affordable creative, that provides a “unique point of view”, but which puts focus on the merchandise, and how that merchandise meets the customer’s needs.

This is separating the noise from what is important. To answer that reader’s question from last week mentioned at the beginning of this posting, my suggestion is to pose a challenge to the creative folks and the merchants. What can they do to create a truly unique looking catalog, that drives response, and can they do it spending 50% less than what is budgeted? Anyone with some basic talent can spend a fortune on designing a catalog that is “perfectly” photographed, and properly executed. That’s no challenge. That’s just doing their job. Moreover, it is creating a catalog that is similar to thousands of other catalogs that have come before it.

The challenge to everyone – including the marketing and circulation team – is to ALL work together at developing a merchandise and creative direction for the catalog.  Creative, merchandise and marketing cannot work independently of each other. Their over-riding goal – what is important, and not noise – is to develop something that drives response. Unique creative does not have to be expensive and perfect. It has to be unique. That’s why it is called “creative”. Everything else you can ignore, and you’ll still manage to get through the day just fine.

By the way, if you have not visited the Datamann website lately, it was recently redesigned, with a new format for the blog that allows you to search on my last five years of musings. (Click here to visit Bill’s new blog site). Awesome stuff!

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by Bill LaPierre

VP – Business Intelligence and Analytics

Datamann – 800-451-4263 x235

blapierre@datamann.com

 

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Marketing Statistics and Alternate Facts

We are all familiar (or you should be) with Captain Renault’s famous line in the movie Casablanca, that he is “shocked, shocked to find that gambling is going on in here”, at which point a croupier hands him a wad of money and says “…Your winnings, sir.”

I’m going to share with you some insight I received via an email recently from a longtime reader of this blog, and longtime friend in the catalog industry. His comments and concerns are a perfect encapsulation of an issue which I hear too few of you discuss, and echo Captain Renault’s famous line.

His email was one of several I received from readers regarding a posting I wrote a few weeks back on the death of the catalog media, and the independent voice which publications like Catalog Age used to bring to our industry. I will share several of the other comments I received from readers over the next few weeks. They all had a common theme, and surprisingly, it was not a wistful, nostalgic yearning for cataloging’s Golden Days. Rather, they all acknowledged that the industry has lost a great deal of knowledge, and basic common sense.

My friend wrote that he was “shocked, shocked” that there could be such a thing as ‘fake news’. He felt that “the people who value this drivel do so because it either reinforces what they already believe or they don’t have a framework for evaluating the ‘facts’ in the story.”

“Which brings me to marketing statistics. Every email service provider, personalized shopping experience vendor, cloud web service seller, total marketing integration service seller with whom I’ve talked has an easy to install, comprehensive reporting suite that will produce pretty graphs showing how effective their product is. How else can I get email, affiliate and PPC services claiming to produce 121% of my total revenue?”

“Without a business strategy the numbers are hard to evaluate and can be used to tell stories that don’t reflect reality. Our company likes to make a profit so we look at order contribution at a business level. If we are not making money on the orders we take in it doesn’t matter what the “reports” say. We also do an analysis by channel but that is secondary. I often wonder whether people who are looking for ‘good marketing statistics’ have a framework for evaluating fake news. That’s really the issue. Without a framework and context numbers don’t matter.”

Mark Twain used to say there were lies, damn lies and statistics. Today he might say there is fake news, alternate facts, and marketing statistics. They all sort of fit together.

My friend’s email reminded me how much I enjoy his wisdom, and his ability to see and state the obvious to which so many other marketers are blind. He is the Sage of Spokane.

His comments reminded me of a speech that a VP of Sales for one of the co-ops gave at NEMOA a few years ago. She was presenting a talk on new customer acquisition, and she used projections from the DMA to show that direct mail was trending to grow in the next 3 years. I remember thinking to myself – now, who is better qualified to project where catalog volume is going? Who would you put your money on? The co-op, a company that has millions of transactions from thousands of catalogs, and who knows every catalog’s mailing trend for the past 20 years? Or, would you put your money on projections from the DMA, a trade lobbying group which has access to no company mailing information, only self-reported survey data? Hmmm…., why would the co-op use the DMA’s projections, and not their own? Maybe because the DMA’s projections are always overly optimistic, and were a better fit for her narrative that day.

How many others in the room came to that conclusion? How many were “shocked, shocked” that she would cite so shallow a source as the DMA, when her own company was sitting on more data about the catalog industry than any other source available?

The issue is not so much being able to evaluate fake “marketing” news. The issue is the brain drain and experience drain our industry has suffered. There are very few people left in our industry that can even execute a really good direct mail campaign. When was the last time you received a piece of mail at work – not an email, but something that went through a postage meter or that had a stamp? No one does it anymore, because they have been lead to believe it no longer works. In their rush to show that they are not email and social media Luddites, and that they can embrace “Millennial marketing”, catalog marketers have dismissed efforts to make their base books stronger and more appealing. In my opinion, catalog marketers today are not creative, they are lemmings.

Yes, I believe that consumer behavior has changed, and is shifting ever more toward mobile – I see it on an individual level when I watch my wife shop from her iPhone. Yes, I believe that websites need to be stronger than catalogs.

But to ensure catalog survival, we must separate fad from trend, statistical fact from marketing fantasy. To my friend’s specific point about every vendor supplying an easy solution, I encounter this phenomenon frequently with clients that are being told by other vendors how easy it should be to “dial up their marketing”. But, these same vendors never ask the client to provide all costs associated with the marketing – the way I do and the way most list brokers would do – to calculate the marketing program’s profitability (or as the my friend stated, “order contribution at a business level”).

Sadly, I still encounter mailers for whom the concept of calculating profitability on a mailing is a new concept. The thought of assigning profitability to other, less tangible marketing is out of the question. (Errors committed by the new generation of catalog mailers will be the topic of a future posting).

The irony of all this is the second part of that famous scene from Casablanca. Renault is shocked, but then he turns around and accepts the cash from the croupier. In the catalog world, many of us know how to detect when data is wrong/ missing/ misleading/ fake, but we smile, accept the report and say “thank you very much”. We don’t push back enough and say “Your data is crap, and your assumptions are misleading.” Although, I have no doubt that some of you tell your internal analysts that, and especially tell it to your vendors, not enough of you do, because you lack the insight to know what is real and what is fake.

Wisdom is an asset that often comes only with time and maturity. Don’t overlook it, and don’t under value it. As Lord Tennyson wrote “Knowledge comes, but wisdom lingers.”

PS: In case you are interested, Casablanca’s Captain Renault has a connection to New Hampshire, where I live. Claude Rains, the actor that played Captain Renault, is buried in Moultonborough, NH. Bet you didn’t know that.

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by Bill LaPierre

VP – Business Intelligence and Analytics

Datamann – 800-451-4263 x235

blapierre@datamann.com

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There Are Still Some New Tricks

A few weeks ago, I wrote about the death of the catalog media, like Multichannel Merchant magazine. In preparation for doing so, I went out to the loft in my garage where I keep old catalogs and old copies of Catalog Age (predecessor to Multichannel Merchant) to get one to use a photo of in the posting.

I looked through a few old issues of Catalog Age from the late 1980s and early 1990s. There were articles that went into great detail explaining the benefits of NCOA, using an 800 number, talk time in the call center, mailing to Canada (that topic never seems to go away), and the best way to allocate multis on a remail. It was a nostalgic trip back to the topics that were so important when I first started in cataloging 30 years ago.

Now where are we? All of these marketing wonders of years past are now taken for granted, or are misunderstood. We no longer debate the pitfalls of desktop publishing, whether to include a FAX number on the order form (most of you don’t even have an order form), and your list broker, who you counted on to negotiate your list deals, has retired. We can’t even count on the likes of Hershell Gordon Lewis and Don Libey to warn us of our excesses and mistakes.

There are still many neat tricks that you can do with a catalog to drive response. But, just like I’m sure a lot of great blacksmithing secrets went to the grave when cars replaced horse and buggies, so too are the many secrets of cataloging going to disappear.

So let me give you a new one for your circulation planning.

Most of you segment your file by RFM, which is fine and adequate for many of you. You further segment by channel – typically by whether a buyer purchased by mail or phone (typically labeled “catalog buyers”), or whether they ordered via your website (typically labeled “internet buyers”). You may also break out your retail store buyers and Amazon-only buyers (which I recommend).

But, it’s the web/internet buyers that can be further segmented to improve your response rate when mailing a catalog. During matchback, those “web buyers” that matched a mailed catalog can be identified as “catalog from web buyers”. These buyers are not true web buyers – they still used/needed the catalog to respond. They will perform better in future mailings than the pure web buyers (customers acquired through SEO, PPC, email, etc.) with whom they were previously grouped.

When Datamann identifies these customers for clients, we keep these “catalog from web” buyers separate from those catalog buyers that ordered over the phone, partly because they perform at a slightly lower response than mail/phone buyers, but also because in the future, they may be the customer to whom you can mail a smaller catalog aimed at driving these buyers to the web.

In general terms, these would be the difference in magnitude in response you would experience between these groups of buyers, when comparing equal RFM segments:
Mail/phone buyers = 3%
Catalog from web buyers = 2.75% to 2.50%
Remaining (pure) web buyers = 1.75% to 1.25%

If you model your names for mailing, your models probably already take this performance by source into consideration. If you use traditional RFM for your mailings, this adds an additional set of segmentation for buyers, and requires an additional step (identification of the names through matchback), but the added value in the difference in response is worth the effort.

Finally, by identifying those web names that in theory, needed no catalog to respond, you have identified those names to which you potentially do not need to mail a catalog, and have potentially reduced your overall circulation expense.

There are still some good tricks to employ to drive response with your catalog. This one is simple to identify, easy to implement, and very profitable. Go to it.

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by Bill LaPierre
VP – Business Intelligence and Analytics
Datamann – 800-451-4263 x235
blapierre@datamann.com

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Only $200, What A Deal!

Last fall, I gave you a detailed explanation of what Kevin Hillstrom would be speaking about at the Datamann catalog seminar, which we host for the VT/NH Marketing Group, on March 30th. (Click here if you missed it – “What Is Missing Is Not Metrics, But How We React To Metrics”)

Yesterday, Kevin’s blog gave a description in his own words of what he will be presenting (VT/NH On March 30 – A New Way To Foster Growth).

There are very few seminars or conferences left that focus on catalog and merchandise issues. Our seminar is one of them, and at only $200, you won’t find a more cost effective and affordable option.

If you are debating how to spend your limited Conference T&E budget, and you are looking for the most value ($200, what a steal!) coupled with the best content and great speakers – the choice is easy….

Join Frank Oliver, Kevin Hillstrom and me on Match 30th in Concord, NH for Reacting To Catalog and Ecommerce Metrics to Change Your Business.

Our seminar last year sold out a full month before the event, so please plan on registering early. Seating will again be limited. Our host hotel, The Marriott Courtyard/Grappone Conference Center, is almost sold out. But there are plenty of other hotels in Concord.

To register for the seminar, click here to visit the VT/NH Marketing Group’s website.

Registration costs for this all day event:

  • $135 for VT/NH Marketing Group members
  • $200 for non-members
  • Registrations are accepted until March 28, 2017

Our host hotel is almost sold out! The Marriott Courtyard/Grappone Conference Center, Concord, NH is located at 70 Constitution Ave in Concord, NH – just north of the intersection of I-89 and I-93. Special room rates of $119 are available for attendees of the seminar for the night of March 29, if you book your room with the Marriott by March 1, 2017. You must mention your attendance at the seminar to receive the special rates, or reserve your room directly at this special link: http://cwp.marriott.com/mhtcn/vtnhmarketinggroup/

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by Bill LaPierre

VP – Business Intelligence and Analytics

Datamann – 800-451-4263 x235

blapierre@datamann.com

 

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Henry’s Many Options

Everyone always asks for specifics on how to grow their catalog business. So, let’s use Henry Repeating Rifles as an example.

Let’s get my gun credentials out of the way. I own two shotguns which belonged to my grandfather, and a .22 single-shot Ithaca rifle which my father bought for me 50 years ago, and which was at least 25 years old at the time. I fire the rifle about once a year, and don’t recall the last time I used either shotgun. Guns do not fascinate me the same way they do for others, but I appreciate how they can be very meaningful to some people.

This past fall, my wife, son and I hosted a high-school exchange student for two weeks from Austria. (My son will be making a reciprocal stay in Austria this spring). Prior to arriving in New Hampshire where we live, the one thing the Austrian student asked to do was visit a shooting range. There are plenty of shooting clubs and outdoor shooting ranges in our area, so we knew we could make arrangements to visit one once the student arrived. We wanted to know specifically what type of experience he was seeking.

It turned out that he had never fired a gun before. He had never even held one. In Austria, the only way to do that – after apparently a lengthy registration process – is to visit a shooting range. So, on his second day with us, I took him out in the backyard, set up some empty cans on a board, and we shot away for an hour with my old .22 rifle. He said later it was one of the highlights of his stay. (Note: one of the advantages of living in rural NH is that no one thinks it odd to hear gun fire coming from their neighbor’s yard).

His interest in my old rifle made me want to investigate a new option. I saw an ad somewhere (I don’t recall where, but it was in one of the magazines to which I subscribe) for a catalog from Henry Rifles, and requested one. They have a beautiful catalog (108 pages), which tells the history of the company (begun in 1860) and shows every rifle they make. But you cannot order from the catalog or online.  You must visit a local dealer, and the catalog I requested came with a list of all the local gun shops in our area that sold Henry rifles.

henry-rifle-cover

Now, they could just leave it there – that the only way you can purchase one of their rifles is through a local retailer. They could rely on those local dealers – most of whom are small mom & pop shops – to be their sales force. But, Henry wants to build demand. They want to drive response. So they have an elaborate consumer catalog that drives sales to those retailers, probably because many of these local retailers cannot afford to advertise on their own. But, there’s more.

Here are the other things that Henry is doing to drive response:

  • They have a half hour infomercial on TV (click here), one of which I landed on one night during the holidays while channel surfing, which prompted me to write this posting. It features the company President, and was actually very entertaining. I’m not sure I’d watch it again, but it was very well done, without looking like an over-the-top Hollywood production.
  • They appear at gun and sportsman shows (their show booth appears in the infomercial), giving their products wide exposure to different markets.
  • They send out great emails – but only about once a month. What makes them great is that they don’t sell. The rest of you send me 2 or 3 emails a day, which I delete. Yet, when I see one from them, I take the time to read it – and I’m not that interested in guns! I am interested in history, and most of their emails have a historical focus. They made it relevant for me.
  • They host numerous gun “events” around the nation, and they get a ton of PR as a result.
  • They have corporate sales, and special commemorative rifles for community organizations like the Masons, Eagles, VFW, and Boy Scouts. (Yes, these organizations still exist, and their members spend money.)
  • They keep creating new commemorative rifles for upcoming anniversaries of other historic events. (Note: these are NEW products).
  • Most important, they have several different lines of rifles – some for target shooting, big game, little game, etc. (Remember, it always comes down to product).

Here’s my point. They could just manufacture their rifles and sell them in retail outlets, like other gun manufactures. They could rely on the retailers to advertise their rifles in newspapers and FSIs.  But they have created a marketing machine to drive attention to their product, and to tell their story. They are doing a bunch of things to drive sales to those retailers, and gain consumer awareness. You know – “branding”.

What are you doing to drive sales for your products beyond having a catalog and a website?

I know what you are going to say – you are going to tell me there is no comparison between a manufacturer and what you do. You are going to tell me they have better margins that allow them to spend money on PR events and TV infomercials.

All of that may be true – but you could be doing so much more than you are. That’s the point. You think of your business only in terms of paper, postage, a website site, with a few emails thrown in. Your job is to sell whatever it is you sell, and make a profit. Don’t limit yourself to think it can only be done by catalogs and a website.

Did it make sense to stick to just a catalog ten years ago? Probably. But those days are gone. You have to look for new options and alternative options, or you will be swept away.  Don’t wait for the customer to come to you. Go to them with some relevant marketing beyond a torrent of daily emails and monthly catalogs. This is the new age of catalog survival. Do some selling!

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by Bill LaPierre

VP – Business Intelligence and Analytics

Datamann – 800-451-4263 x235

blapierre@datamann.com

 

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