What Happens To Catalogs When …

This posting is part 3 of What Is To Become Of Single Title Catalogs – Revisited 2017.

There is a great scene in the 1967 movie Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner? that speaks to where the catalog industry is today. In case you don’t recall, or have never seen the movie, Katherine Hepburn and Spencer Tracy portray a married couple whose 23-year-old daughter wants to marry Sidney Poitier, who plays the role of a black doctor, and who is equally in love with their daughter. This movie was a big deal because interracial marriage was still illegal in 17 states when it came out.

The movie takes place during an 8-hour period, as the parents of Sidney Poitier’s character, and Hepburn and Tracy, are all trying to come to grips with the idea. At one point, Spencer Tracy is talking with Beah Richards, the actress playing Poitier’s mother. She is trying to understand why her husband and the character played by Spencer Tracy are both having such a problem with this planned marriage. Tracy’s character is opposed to the marriage, and Sidney Poitier has already stated that unless he approves, there will be no marriage. Poitier’s mother says the following:

What happens to men when they grow old? Why do they forget everything? I believe…those two young people need each other…like they need the air to breathe in. Anybody can see that by just looking at them. But you and my husband might as well be blind men. You can only see that they have a problem. But do you really know what’s happened to them? How they feel about each other? I believe… that men grow old. And when sexual things no longer matter to them, they forget it all. They forget what true passion is. If you ever felt what my son… feels for your daughter, you’ve forgotten everything about it. My husband too. You knew once… but that was a long time ago. Now the two of you don’t know. And the strange thing… for your wife and me…is that you don’t even remember. If you did…how could you do what you are doing?”

When Catalogs Grow Old:

What happens to catalogs when they grow old? Why do they forget? Why do they lose the passion that brought about their being in the first place and made them successful?

The retirement of Mikey Drexler as CEO of J Crew is, as Kevin Hillstrom stated, is the end of an era. He was not only a great retailer, but a greater cataloger. His departure is an opportune time to reflect on what is happening as catalogs grow old.

I can remember going to DMA Catalog Conferences in the 1980s and 1990s, and there were always one or two great catalog “personalities” that gave keynote speeches. They didn’t talk about how they were using retargeting to drive a 2.8% lift in response.   They did not talk about their cloud computing systems. They talked about their passion for the merchandise they were selling, and the passion they had for their customers.

Most important, they talked about how there was always another dragon to slay – their personal quest was to make the catalog a great place to work, a great place for their customers to purchase products, and a successful company (meaning: profitable). The quest was all about slaying the next dragon, and the next, to accomplish all these goals, and have peace in the kingdom.

Today, catalogs seem to have as much interest in their customers as United Airlines does for its passengers. Today, it is about catching the prey, and making them pay. There is no focus on who the customer is and what the customer wants. The co-ops have an algorithm that finds viable names for you to mail. But, do you really know what those prospects value in you? Do you know what those buyers really want from you?

The quest is gone. As Beah Richard’s character says, “You have forgotten what true passion is.” For catalogs, there are still dragons to slay, but most catalogs have given up, leaving someone else to slay them.

The reason the quest is gone has two parts:

First, remember the old saying about buying computers, that “no one will ever fault you for buying IBM?”  It was the safe choice. There is an equivalent in catalogs today. It is to be predictable. It’s always easy to do the predictable. If the predictable doesn’t work, no one is going to question or blame you, because it is what you are supposed to do. If it doesn’t work, it must be the fault of the economy, weather, or Amazon.

Look at these recent catalog covers. They are predictable.

Just looking at three covers from each company you might not think that. But line up a year’s worth of these covers, and you will see that they are not only boring, but have no passion. It is not just the covers either, but the whole tired product assortment and direction of the catalog. The original founders of these titles had passion, but passion is a luxury they can no longer afford, as passion requires you to break the mold and test new things that run the risk of not working.

In the three examples above, it is easy to see my point about passionless catalogs just going through the motions to keep the presses rolling. But be honest – are your catalogs any different? When was the last time you had a customer contact you and say, “Wow, I really love what you are doing with your catalog. I can’t wait for it to come each month”?  Conversely, when was the last time a customer said, “Man, I really hate what you are doing now”? Either response from a customer would show that there was still some interest out there, and that they were at least looking at your catalog, as opposed to their phone. But I’ll bet that if you are honest, it’s been quite a while since you received either one of those types of comments. That what being predictable will get you.

The second reason that the quest is gone is that most catalog companies rely upon one thing for their continued survival – efficiency. Catalog production follows a very rigid, tight schedule which pervades almost everything a catalog does. Can’t miss a deadline at the printer, can’t risk having the books go out late. Can’t try anything new, can’t risk not making the budgeted goal for the year (even if the goal is 5% less than last year).

The big catalog conglomerates (BluStem/Orchard Brands, Potpourri Group, Cornerstone) keep acquiring more catalog titles because it makes their investment in efficiency even more profitable. But, you never see other catalog companies purchase online-only companies because those types of companies would not fit into their efficiency model – there is no synergy, no gains in productivity. “If their customers are online only, I can’t mail them a catalog, which is not going to help my co-mail pool savings, so why would I want to acquire a company like that?”

That line of thinking makes Amazon’s purchase of Whole Foods all the more intriguing. There are multiple dragons in this deal for Jeff Bezos to slay. His quest is just beginning, while many of you feel your quest is nearing twilight.

Can you learn to love selling without a catalog, by using all the tools of ecommerce?  Can you get the passion back? The first thing to do is to stop being so predictable. Then stop worrying about being so efficient.

“You knew once… but that was a long time ago. And the strange thing…is that you don’t even remember. If you did…how could you do what you are doing now?”

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by Bill LaPierre

VP – Business Intelligence and Analytics

Datamann – 800-451-4263 x235

blapierre@datamann.com

 

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Catalog Creative In A New World

Let me do something different today – I’m going to offer comments on a catalog that I think is doing an adequate job (that’s as complimentary as I get) from a “creative” perspective, but is certainly not a traditional catalog. I’m also going to check how they are doing against my list of 21 catalog creative rules, and in the process, illustrate why many of those rules don’t apply here.

Let me be clear, it is a catalog from which I would never purchase. It is also not necessarily catalog creative that I like, or that resonates with me – but contains “creative and design elements” that I expect resonates with the catalog’s intended audience.

The catalog is NatureBox, which is a relative new comer mailing since at least 2014, and is from what could best be described as an “online company”. NatureBox is a membership program ($50/year) that you must join, and they ship you snack food, which you have to pay for on top of the yearly membership fee. (Note: they have all kinds of deals/rebates on their website, so please don’t write to me to tell me I have their pricing wrong).  Right off the bat you are spending $50 for the privilege of buying snack food that you could buy at just about any supermarket, and most gas stations.

Not off to a good start

I received these two catalogs earlier this year, one addressed to me, one to one of my seed names.

My first reaction to this company as catalog marketing mavens was not good, since I considered the cover test they were conducting to be a classic example of a test that makes no difference.  What does it prove? How do you act on this in the future if the one on the left does better than the one on the right? I am certain that the creative director at NatureBox could explain in painful detail the difference between these two covers, and how each resonates to a different type of person. But, come on…to the average consumer, there’s no difference here, so stop doing stupid tests like this.

Don’t Tell Me About Your Grass Seed, Tell Me About My Lawn

Oh God, no! Right on page 2 – the most valuable page in the catalog – they have a President’s letter, Actually, it’s worse than that – it’s a letter from Travis, the Director of Sourcing and Innovation. Travis tells us how he likes to “discover and develop new and unique flavors”. The focus of the copy is all about NatureBox and Travis, and nothing about you, the consumer. Plus, there is no mention anywhere in the letter that this is a membership offer – oh, why be so sneaky? If you are going to waste space with a letter, don’t you think that’s the place to tell the consumer the part of about the $50, but then also explain that you get a $50 credit applied towards purchases? That’s kind of basic customer service courtesy. (The only reference to the membership is on page 27 – one lonely line of copy that says “join today – NatureBox is only $5 per month, which is credited towards your purchases”).

Between the cover and page 2, these guys are failing two of my basic rules of catalog creative, which are no dumb cover tests, and no president’s letters.

However, page 3 gets us back track, because they show their eight top snacks. That’s good merchandising – show the best stuff up front, and tell me it is your best stuff.

But, the copy, which is tiny (can’t be more than 3 point font), never tells how much you get. Do I get a bag of each snack, a box, 2 ounces, 10 ounces – what? Maybe you get the amount of product shown in the photo? That isn’t clear if that is what I get. Further on in the catalog, on the “nuts” page, each sampling of nuts is listed as 8 oz., so their labeling/merchandising is inconsistent.

However, go to their website, and it is a different story. Each product description lists in detail the serving portion.

Below is their center spread – which does no selling. Oddly, it shows 11 icons, which you can use to “shop our catalog using these filters”. But again, these “filter icons” appear sporadically through the catalog, and not on every page or product, so how do you use them to shop the catalog?

Finally – this is their exit spread (below), with again, no selling.

In a 36-page catalog, 12 of the pages, one third of the total catalog, have no selling, and six of the remaining pages are selling a single product, the highest priced of which is $3.79.

Why This Is Not So Bad

As with many things in life, one of the things which you learn as a catalog consultant is that not all rules apply to all catalogs. If this catalog were selling garden tools, this “minimalist/lifestyle” approach would not work. People who buy those types of products want specifics, and are not impressed by lifestyle imagery.

People who are willing to spend $50 just for the privilege of buying snacks are probably equally concerned with those details, but NatureBox recognizes that they cannot “seal the deal” to get you to be a member from the catalog alone. You have to go to the website to do that.

Consequently, this catalog is a 32-page web driver. Its primary purpose is to sell you on the concept of buying healthy snack food, in a convenient way, at seemingly very affordable prices, as almost all the “snacks” are under $4.00. Moreover, these customers are not taking the time to calculate the cost per pound to determine the equivalent cost at Wal-Mart.

As a marketer, the temptation for me would be to gut this catalog of those 12 non-selling pages, get the page count down to 24, and add in a ton of extra products, with longer, more detailed descriptions. That would probably be a huge mistake. The margins on the products in this catalog are probably obscene, which is what allows them to have 1/3 of the catalog not selling anything beyond a warm feeling, and force people to go to the website.

Are there creative changes I would make to this existing book? Yes, I’d stop the cover tests and get rid of Travis’s letter. But other than that, we have to recognize that this is a new world. This is an example of a catalog where the website is MUCH stronger than the catalog, which alone negates many of my “21 catalog creative rules”.

NatureBox is also an example of how an online company maxed out its ability to acquire customers online with PPC, SEO, etc. Search on “healthy snacks by mail” and you’ll discover a host of companies doing the same thing, including Graze, Healthy Surprise, and Urthbox. NatureBox’s catalog is just one more tool to reach different audiences, though sadly was mistargeted at me.

The lesson here – NatureBox’s catalog creative – with all of its drawbacks in a traditional catalog world – probably resonates with their target customer, and reinforces the concept that your website MUST be stronger than your catalog.

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by Bill LaPierre

VP – Business Intelligence and Analytics

Datamann – 800-451-4263 x235

blapierre@datamann.com

 

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Whose Call Is This – the CEO, Marketing or Merchandise?

Here was the question – “I’m a merchant, battling what our marketers do. In my opinion, catalog marketing optimization has its downsides, namely, blindly going where the response rates lie.  As more money is spent on the catalog, the optimization tactics our marketing department use quickly become our brand face.  Our catalog promotes an outdoor lifestyle, but because of always chasing response, our top sales drivers are more likely to be a turtleneck than a tent.  What can I as the merchant do, because I see this direction as ultimately destroying what originally made our company different?”

This question was from a reader of this blog, which I used in the Q&A portion of our catalog seminar in March. I asked Frank Oliver, our “merchant” at the seminar, to address the question. I had not shared the question with Frank previously.

As a merchant, it would have been easy for him to agree with this question, and put all the blame on marketing, as the reader who posed the question had done. But after a slight pause to consider his response, Frank replied “So, this merchant is complaining that one set of products is selling better than another, and is blaming marketing? This is not a marketing issue. Marketing does not pick what products go in the book. The CEO sets the direction for what products will exemplify the company’s “mission/brand”, and the merchants carry that direction out. Don’t blame marketing for driving response.”

“The optimization tactics our marketing department use quickly become our brand face. I’m a marketer, so I can imagine what tactics the merchant is referring to, namely using the co-ops for prospecting. If marketing instructs the co-ops to provide the most responsive names, and the co-op’s database skews towards an older consumer (let’s say 55+), then this merchant’s logic is that marketing has driven the catalog off its intended course by loading up on customers that don’t belong to the merchant’s vision of the intended customer.

I look at this a little differently. If you didn’t want to go to Chicago, why did you get on the bus bound for Chicago? If you did not want turtlenecks to become the “brand face”, why did you put them in the catalog in the first place? The reader stated that the catalog promotes “an outdoor lifestyle”. If the catalog is doing a decent job of promoting that “lifestyle”, then any product the consumer purchases gives them a connection to that lifestyle. Don’t blame marketing if the products being purchased begin to skew away from an intended or original mission for the company. The products in the catalog or on the website are there because the merchants put them there – and I’ve never met a merchant who did not think that every new product would sell well.

Besides, name a successful catalog or company where the product selection has not evolved over time. Isn’t the purpose of a company to maximize profits for the owners/shareholders? Wouldn’t that dictate that you sell the products that the customer wants, rather the ones which you think they want, or you think they should have? Yes, I know, you are going to point to Apple and quote Steve Jobs who probably said something cool about not selling turtlenecks when you could sell tents. But using this example, if your margins are sound on the turtlenecks, and the customers you acquire on turtlenecks convert to buy other products (like tents) from you, what’s the problem?

Yes, I agree that some marketing tactics can skew the composition of the audience. In the late 1980s when I took over as the marketing guy at Brookstone, I found that our prospecting strategy consisted of always offering a cheap premium (free jackknife or flashlight) with each first-time order. To drive response, the prospecting lists acquired from our rental/exchange partners (this was before the co-ops) were their “sale” buyers. All this strategy did was attract the pond-scum from everyone else’s files that wanted a free jackknife. So, this is not a new concept.

Ten years ago, the concept that the co-ops were skewing the composition of the customer base may not have been as well understood, or as evident, as my Brookstone model. But everyone in cataloging today should understand that the co-ops are skewing the composition of your buyers, certainly toward an older consumer. Can they also be skewed toward a propensity to purchase one type of product over another – certainly.  If a modeler at one of the co-ops knows that by providing you one group of names (turtleneck buyers) over another group (tent byers) that your response rate will be 10% greater, they are going to give you the higher performing names. The result of that might be more turtlenecks sold than tents.

The question becomes not how we got here or who is to blame. The question is whether you can make a course correction now. Ultimately, the companies that carve out a unique position in the market via merchandise will be the ones that survive. That may mean merchants need to prune from the product assortment those products that are commodity in nature and not in keeping with a product strategy that promotes that “uniqueness”. Of course, the CEO, and Board of Directors, must acknowledge that a move like this might mean forgoing short-term gain on the turtlenecks, to ensure long time survival by focusing on tents.

To answer the merchant’s original question as to what he can do, he can make everyone – especially the CEO – aware of the tradeoffs involved with maximizing response versus maintaining a unique identity via merchandise. And if the CEO still wants to take the bus to Chicago, at least you have made everyone aware of the consequences.

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by Bill LaPierre

VP – Business Intelligence and Analytics

Datamann – 800-451-4263 x235

blapierre@datamann.com

 

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The Magnum PI Look Is The Giveaway

Why do you always aim for perfection instead of change?

At last year’s Datamann catalog and ecommerce seminar, which Datamann hosts and sponsors for the VT/NH Marketing Group, the local chamber of commerce in Concord, NH had a pile of the magazine pictured below in the conference center lobby.

Do you notice anything wrong?

Look at the guy’s sweater and his mustache. Look at her hair cut. This photo is from the late 1980s!

Because I worked next door to the Eastern Mountain Sports headquarters in Peterborough, NH for more than 20 years, I recognized the photo immediately as being from an EMS catalog from that time frame, 25+ years ago!

This is not an isolated occurrence or problem. Almost every catalog is guilty of it. I see many of you using the same photos in your catalogs year after year. Usually, you don’t have models that have a “dated” look, but some of you do. (Do most women wear eye shadow and earrings when they go camping?)

If your response is lagging on some products that used to do well, take a count of how many consecutive times that product has had the same photo in your catalog. I’ve seen instances where the same photo appeared more than 100 times consecutively, with no changes! Of course, not only does the photo not change, but the headline and copy block often remain unaltered for years as well.

I’m going to refrain from showing examples of this, as it would become a game of “gotcha”. There would be little value to readers to embarrass those you that fall into this trap. But, you know who you are, and if is response is lagging – change it up a little.

The reason that most of you do not do more photography is that you want perfection. As an industry, we spend a fortune on new photography. Only a few of you do what I call “make do with good enough” photography.  Sure, you can’t rely on your cell phone to take product pictures, but do you really need to bring in an outside photographer, a lighting technician, a stylist, and a model to shoot a sweatshirt? Or a lawn sprinkler?

You still look upon your catalog as being something for which the Library of Congress is waiting. Even though you know that Catalog Age magazine is not around anymore to give you an award for “Catalog of the Year”, just in case someone else is, you don’t want to be marked down for any photography that is less than perfect. And of course, perfection is expensive. So, you stick with the same photo that has been used 100 times (literally) before because you can’t afford to shoot a new one.

But here is what is so puzzling to me. You won’t shoot your own stills for the catalog or website, but you are willing to shoot your own video, of your latest “behind the scenes at our company”, and post it to YouTube, with minimal editing, minimal changes, and certainly, no “professional look”.  You agonize over catalog photography and models, but will throw anything on YouTube.  I actually agree with getting videos on your website and YouTube frequently and cheaply.  I’m puzzled over the continued striving for perfection on static photography.  What’s wrong with “make do with good enough”?

Let’s try a test. Instead of doing yet another useless cover test, let’s do a photography test. Unless you are a high-end fashion catalog with a $500 average order, try having someone in the creative department use their own camera (not a phone) to shoot a few products in the next catalog. See if sales fall off dramatically for those products if you don’t go for “perfection” but instead go for “change”.   Change is good.

Your customer may not have the historical memory that I do, but they recognize when they have seen something repeatedly. That’s when they stop opening your catalog at all.

This year’s seminar – which is now only three weeks away – is not about catalog creative per se. But it is about the need to change, the need to evolve. If you have not already registered for the seminar, click here to visit the VT/NH Marketing Group’s website.

Registration costs for this all day event:

  • $135 for VT/NH Marketing Group members
  • $200 for non-members
  • Registrations are accepted until March 28, 2017

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by Bill LaPierre

VP – Business Intelligence and Analytics

Datamann – 800-451-4263 x235

blapierre@datamann.com

 

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B2B Medical Catalogs

I write too often in this space about consumer catalogs, and don’t devote enough attention to B2B catalogs. So, if you are a consumer cataloger, you can take this week off. I’m going to take a look at the sterile world of medical catalogs.

Many B2B catalogs seem to be 15 years behind their consumer counterparts. They do little to drive a response. They simply present a product – actually a ton of products – with little to differentiate these products and help the buyer determine which is best for them. Maybe they have not yet felt the sting of online competition.

I suspect B2B catalogs are the way they are for another reason. We all know the problem inherent with B2B catalogs of not always knowing who at the company should receive or did receive our catalog, and that person is often not the one who actually places the order. I believe that B2B catalog designers picture a procurement clerk or manager of supplies sitting at a darkened desk, ordering products from a catalog for someone else in the company that will eventually use the product. Thus, they make the catalog easy to order from for the bureaucratic clerks, but do little to design the catalog to generate a response from the ultimate end user.

Medical catalogs are the worst at this, because they seem to compound the problem of product presentation with the assumption that all medical staff can immediately tell what every product is for, and which of the 17 versions of leg braces is ideal for their needs.

Look at these four pages from the MediChoice catalog. Whether the page is selling surgical scrubs, portable tables, or stethoscopes, the pages all look alike – which is incredibly boring to browse. Further, there is nothing to indicate that a specific product is “Our best seller” or “Our Most Popular Style”. There is no effort here to sell – just SKU barfing page after page.

 

These pages are designed for ease of ordering by the supply officer. It is not intended for the doctor or medical professional trying to determine the best option.

Contrast that design approach to these pages below from MarketLab catalog, where each page is visually different in design. There are color blocks, angled photographs, and large copy callouts of “new” and “play the video”, all catalog design elements missing from the MediChoice catalog.

 

Plus, the headlines for most products contain a product benefit. All these design elements – which are pretty basic catalog creative stuff – all catch your attention, and help drive response. They drive response because they are “selling”.

Do this if you are a B2B cataloger: take you catalog and rip out 10 pages. Shuffle them up so that they are in random page sequence. Lay them out on the floor, and then stand up and look down at them. Unless you have incredible eye site, this forces you to look at the pages from the proverbial 30,000 foot view, rather than looking at the individual product detail. Do the pages look significantly different, or do you they all look like the MediChoice pages?

B2B catalogs still need to focus on selling. You can no longer simply throw some products on the page and expect they will sell by themselves because someone needs them. You can do better than that. Go sell!

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by Bill LaPierre

VP – Business Intelligence and Analytics

Datamann – 800-451-4263 x235

blapierre@datamann.com

 

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Learning From Hunting Catalogs

It’s hunting season across much of the country, so let’s look at some hunting catalogs. Although I have not hunted since I was in high school, I receive many hunting catalogs. I have nothing against hunting or people who enjoy it. My problem is that I tend to be very loud in the woods (HEY! I THINK THE DEER ARE OVER HERE) so no one wants to hunt with me.

First, let me draw a distinction about hunting catalogs. There are two kinds. There are those for real hunters (which are the ones I’m critiquing today) and the ones for guys who simply want to dress the part (this would include, in my opinion, catalogs like Guideboat, Filson).  I learned recently there is a group of people called Lumbersexuals – men that want to dress like lumberjacks, but who live in the city. So maybe there is a corresponding group of Huntersexuals – guys that want to wear plaid shirts and camo pants, while driving around in their Toyota pick-up.

NiteLite Catalog:

This catalog has everything you need for raccoon hunting, which is usually done at night.  They had a product that caught my attention and which prompted me to write today’s posting.

nitelite-nov-2016-p46-cropp

It marries your iPhone with your rifle scope, so the image through the scope is much bigger (good for guys like me with bad eyesight). I thought this was a cool product, but it is lost on the spread (see below) because every product here has the same weight.

nitelite-nov-2016-p4647-ful

This is a common problem with many hard good catalogs, certainly most B2B catalogs. The merchants want to pack as many products as they can per spread, not understanding that giving some products just a “bit more space” will generate more sales per page overall.

However, this creative issue is only a slight problem with this catalog because there are several spreads that feature just one product per page of what I suspect are some of NiteLite’s best products.

nitelite-nov-2016-p61

NiteLite owns this product category. They have to show product domination, and product expertise – which they fully present here. There is no space wasted on branding. This is the ultimate execution of the hero shot. But what’s important to remember is that they are doing this to show all of the product’s features. It’s not a full page given over to an overpriced flannel shirt that has no features beyond being overpriced. This presentation reinforces that NiteLite is where you go for ‘coon hunting products, because they are the experts.

Legendary Whitetails:

Nationwide, participation in deer hunting has been trending down overtime, mostly due to changing demographics. But this catalog, featuring products for deer hunting, does a great job of holding the customer’s attention by focusing on product.

lw-nov-2016-p2-3

This is the opening spread. There’s no wasted space on branding, no “how to use this catalog” information, not even a useless “president’s letter”. They jump right into selling.   They can do this because they are not trying to create a “lifestyle”. Their customer already has a lifestyle with which they are comfortable.

The catalog has strong product density – not too many products to look crowded, but enough to drive sales, which also lends a level of authenticity to this catalog.

lw-nov-2016-p28-29

And similar to NiteLite’s full page hero shots, Legendry Whitetails has several one-page presentations meant to really drive home the fact that they are the experts in deer hunting apparel.

lw-nov-2016-p55

However, I do have three knocks against the catalog from a “creative” perspective:

  • The copy font is way too small. Take it up a point or two, and if you have to, cut some of it out.
  • There are too few call-outs throughout the catalog to go to the website. Remember, your website has to be better than your catalog, and your catalog has to drive people to the website.
  • Where are the hunting photos? No, I don’t want you wasting space in the book trying to showcase a “lifestyle”, but show some of these products being worn by real hunters in real hunting situations.

Cabela’s

Over the years, I have written how Cabela’s continues to mix up the formats of what they send me. One week will be postcard, followed by a five-panel brochure, followed by a mini-12-page catalog. This week I received a 172 page Holiday catalog. The focus with Cabela’s is always to get me to go to the website. They get it, and they are one of the few catalogs that execute it well.

cabelas-holiday-2016-p42-4

But they also understand the power of “realistic selling”. Look at the photo above. If you have ever been ice fishing at sunset, you know the cold cuts right through you (my father used to take me ice fishing and I was always frozen). You know this photo probably cost Cabela’s a lot. It is perfectly propped and shot. But, it communicates perfectly that these coats will keep you warm far more than laydown studio shot. This is worth the expense.

I have said before “branding is what you do every day”. Branding cannot be created by fancy creative. Branding is your merchandise. If you get the merchandise right, sometimes it will almost sell itself.

Enjoy the hunt.

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by Bill LaPierre

VP – Business Intelligence and Analytics

Datamann – 800-451-4263 x235

blapierre@datamann.com

 

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