Catalog Creative In A New World

Let me do something different today – I’m going to offer comments on a catalog that I think is doing an adequate job (that’s as complimentary as I get) from a “creative” perspective, but is certainly not a traditional catalog. I’m also going to check how they are doing against my list of 21 catalog creative rules, and in the process, illustrate why many of those rules don’t apply here.

Let me be clear, it is a catalog from which I would never purchase. It is also not necessarily catalog creative that I like, or that resonates with me – but contains “creative and design elements” that I expect resonates with the catalog’s intended audience.

The catalog is NatureBox, which is a relative new comer mailing since at least 2014, and is from what could best be described as an “online company”. NatureBox is a membership program ($50/year) that you must join, and they ship you snack food, which you have to pay for on top of the yearly membership fee. (Note: they have all kinds of deals/rebates on their website, so please don’t write to me to tell me I have their pricing wrong).  Right off the bat you are spending $50 for the privilege of buying snack food that you could buy at just about any supermarket, and most gas stations.

Not off to a good start

I received these two catalogs earlier this year, one addressed to me, one to one of my seed names.

My first reaction to this company as catalog marketing mavens was not good, since I considered the cover test they were conducting to be a classic example of a test that makes no difference.  What does it prove? How do you act on this in the future if the one on the left does better than the one on the right? I am certain that the creative director at NatureBox could explain in painful detail the difference between these two covers, and how each resonates to a different type of person. But, come on…to the average consumer, there’s no difference here, so stop doing stupid tests like this.

Don’t Tell Me About Your Grass Seed, Tell Me About My Lawn

Oh God, no! Right on page 2 – the most valuable page in the catalog – they have a President’s letter, Actually, it’s worse than that – it’s a letter from Travis, the Director of Sourcing and Innovation. Travis tells us how he likes to “discover and develop new and unique flavors”. The focus of the copy is all about NatureBox and Travis, and nothing about you, the consumer. Plus, there is no mention anywhere in the letter that this is a membership offer – oh, why be so sneaky? If you are going to waste space with a letter, don’t you think that’s the place to tell the consumer the part of about the $50, but then also explain that you get a $50 credit applied towards purchases? That’s kind of basic customer service courtesy. (The only reference to the membership is on page 27 – one lonely line of copy that says “join today – NatureBox is only $5 per month, which is credited towards your purchases”).

Between the cover and page 2, these guys are failing two of my basic rules of catalog creative, which are no dumb cover tests, and no president’s letters.

However, page 3 gets us back track, because they show their eight top snacks. That’s good merchandising – show the best stuff up front, and tell me it is your best stuff.

But, the copy, which is tiny (can’t be more than 3 point font), never tells how much you get. Do I get a bag of each snack, a box, 2 ounces, 10 ounces – what? Maybe you get the amount of product shown in the photo? That isn’t clear if that is what I get. Further on in the catalog, on the “nuts” page, each sampling of nuts is listed as 8 oz., so their labeling/merchandising is inconsistent.

However, go to their website, and it is a different story. Each product description lists in detail the serving portion.

Below is their center spread – which does no selling. Oddly, it shows 11 icons, which you can use to “shop our catalog using these filters”. But again, these “filter icons” appear sporadically through the catalog, and not on every page or product, so how do you use them to shop the catalog?

Finally – this is their exit spread (below), with again, no selling.

In a 36-page catalog, 12 of the pages, one third of the total catalog, have no selling, and six of the remaining pages are selling a single product, the highest priced of which is $3.79.

Why This Is Not So Bad

As with many things in life, one of the things which you learn as a catalog consultant is that not all rules apply to all catalogs. If this catalog were selling garden tools, this “minimalist/lifestyle” approach would not work. People who buy those types of products want specifics, and are not impressed by lifestyle imagery.

People who are willing to spend $50 just for the privilege of buying snacks are probably equally concerned with those details, but NatureBox recognizes that they cannot “seal the deal” to get you to be a member from the catalog alone. You have to go to the website to do that.

Consequently, this catalog is a 32-page web driver. Its primary purpose is to sell you on the concept of buying healthy snack food, in a convenient way, at seemingly very affordable prices, as almost all the “snacks” are under $4.00. Moreover, these customers are not taking the time to calculate the cost per pound to determine the equivalent cost at Wal-Mart.

As a marketer, the temptation for me would be to gut this catalog of those 12 non-selling pages, get the page count down to 24, and add in a ton of extra products, with longer, more detailed descriptions. That would probably be a huge mistake. The margins on the products in this catalog are probably obscene, which is what allows them to have 1/3 of the catalog not selling anything beyond a warm feeling, and force people to go to the website.

Are there creative changes I would make to this existing book? Yes, I’d stop the cover tests and get rid of Travis’s letter. But other than that, we have to recognize that this is a new world. This is an example of a catalog where the website is MUCH stronger than the catalog, which alone negates many of my “21 catalog creative rules”.

NatureBox is also an example of how an online company maxed out its ability to acquire customers online with PPC, SEO, etc. Search on “healthy snacks by mail” and you’ll discover a host of companies doing the same thing, including Graze, Healthy Surprise, and Urthbox. NatureBox’s catalog is just one more tool to reach different audiences, though sadly was mistargeted at me.

The lesson here – NatureBox’s catalog creative – with all of its drawbacks in a traditional catalog world – probably resonates with their target customer, and reinforces the concept that your website MUST be stronger than your catalog.

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by Bill LaPierre

VP – Business Intelligence and Analytics

Datamann – 800-451-4263 x235

blapierre@datamann.com