If I Were You

Right after our catalog seminar a few weeks ago, I received a number of emails from attendees thanking me for the event, expressing their enjoyment with the presentations, suggestions for next year, etc. All good stuff and all sincerely appreciated.

(For My UK readers – please see the note at the very end of today’s posting).

One attendee, a vendor, wrote that “I totally get that it is fun to pick on vendors and the bright, shiny objects that we are peddling.  But as a former mailer/digital marketer, I am keenly aware that understanding the advances in technology and what they mean to my business prospects is critical.” He went to say that our seminar in the future could be a “neutral ground” to “educate marketers on what technology makes possible, and teaches (forces?) them to think about how they can leverage the technology advances to grow their businesses”.

A neutral ground? Hmmm…

How would I manage to have a neutral ground if I allowed one vendor to promote their “shiny new objects”, while denying that opportunity to others?  I couldn’t, and I’m not even going to try.

Our catalog seminar each March (you can circle March 29, 2018 on next year’s calendar) is almost a year-long undertaking for me, so I’m glad attendees found it worthwhile. I’m delighted when they take the time to write with suggestions.

But I believe the success of our event lies in not promoting “specific” new technologies or new methods of using old technologies. Rather, it lies in helping traditional catalogers see how they must evolve their business in general to stay competitive. Whether it is thinking less like a cataloger, thinking more like an ecommerce or even mobile marketer, or how to confront the reality of Amazon, our seminar will continue to offer more generic solutions that are timeless, rather than the bright, shiny new object that will be obsolete in a year’s time.

If I Were You

I have not been to the Internet Retailer Conference (IRCE) in a few years, but one of the things I always enjoyed about their conference was that it featured speakers talking about the newest/greatest technology. IRCE made little effort to screen speakers and keep them from giving a pitch for their product.  My feeling on this is that the online technology is changing so quickly, you have to have a forum like IRCE where the latest and greatest is presented, even if the presentations tip too much toward being a sales pitch.

Since there is no way Datamann’s seminar (which we host for the VT/NH Marketing Group) could ever offer the breadth of information on new technologies that are offered in the hundreds of presentations at IRCE, why even try?  At IRCE, let the buyer beware, just as catalogers had to pick our way through the maze of vendors and presentations back in the 1980s at the Catalog Conference.

If I were a catalog mailer today, I would attend the IRCE, with my eyes wide open. I’d look for every cool new idea, and zero in on the ones where the presenter/ vendor offered proven examples of how their technology could help me in the next three to six months.

When you are attending a conference with 15,000 other attendees, it is impossible to digest everything at once. But trust your gut instinct on who seems to have a believable story. Years ago, Ben Perez, my former boss at Millard Group, used to say that “some things just smell like 3 day old fish”. You’ll be able tell which vendors are pushing three day old fish, and which aren’t.

Learn to be skeptical. Here’s an example: at the NEMOA conference in March, the Postmaster General was a no show. She sent one of her trusted deputies in her place. He gave an overview of issues the postal services is dealing with, and the new services being offered. Plus, he provided some interesting statistics, one of which is that although since 2012 mail volume is down, “engagement with mail was up, with an additional 25% of households reporting a strong attachment to mail.” So what does that mean? What is a strong attachment to mail? How do you quantify that? How did they determine that “attachment” was up 25% in the past five years? Learn to be skeptical.

In addition, keep a check on your enthusiasm when you get home. As one person wrote to me before our seminar last month “I wanted you to know that although I will not be attending your conference, it’s (IMHO) the best in the business. I am not attending to allow two other staff  to go. Your other reader is absolutely correct, most conferences are a “vendor cesspool” and I welcome the day a newbie (or seasoned marketer for that matter) returns from the typical national conference with more than unbridled enthusiasm for some new start-up that plans to further squeeze our dwindling profit dollars. “

Finally, to my many subscribers in the UK, if I were you, I’d plan on attending the Direct Commerce Association’s Annual Summit (click here) on June 15 at the Hurlingham Club in London. (Awesome looking venue!).  Kevin Hillstrom will be presenting a new and improved version of the business simulation he presented at our seminar last month, and Amy Africa will be presenting her latest take on “The good, the bad & the downright ugly” of websites. Kevin and Amy together, in London – Wow!

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by Bill LaPierre

VP – Business Intelligence and Analytics

Datamann – 800-451-4263 x235

blapierre@datamann.com